HEAD LICE.PDF
The head louse is one of three types of lice that infest people. These tiny insects (about 1/10 to 1/8 of an inch long) make their home in human hair and feed on human blood. Head lice multiply rapidly, laying small greyish-colored oval-shaped eggs (called nits) which they glue to the base of the hair, close to the scalp.


CHICKEN POX.PDF
Chickenpox, also called varicella, is an itchy rash illness caused by a virus.

INFLUENZA.PDF
Influenza (flu) is a respiratory disease caused by a virus that attacks the nose, throat, and lungs. It can be mild, but is sometimes severe and at times can lead to death. It is not the same as the “stomach flu.”

STREP THROAT.PDF
Group A streptococci are bacteria commonly found in the throat and on the skin. People may carry GAS in the throat or on the skin and not become ill.

STOMACH FLU (NOROVIRUS).PDF

Noroviruses are a group of viruses (previously known as Norwalk-like viruses) that can cause gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Norovirus is the leading cause of foodborne illness outbreaks in Minnesota. This infection is often mistakenly referred to as the “stomach flu”. Norovirus is not related to the flu (influenza), which is a common respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus.

EBOLA.PDF
EBOLA - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS.PDF
Ebola disease is caused by the Ebola virus and is one of a number of hemorrhagic fever diseases. Ebola disease causes severe illness in which 50-90 percent of those infected die. Ebola disease was first discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo near the Ebola River.

WHOOPING COUGH (PERTUSSIS).PDF

Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a disease that affects the lungs. Pertussis bacteria are spread from person to person through the air. A person with pertussis develops a severe cough that usually lasts four to six weeks or longer.  Pertussis can be very serious, especially in infants.